Author: Iain Maloney

Walkaway by Cory Doctorow

Walkaway Cory Doctorow Head of Zeus, 504 pages Review by Joanna McLaughlin What would happen if instead of trying to improve a corrupt society – or even just survive it – we chose to turn our backs on it altogether? This is the premise of Cory Doctorow’s new novel, Walkaway, in which the main characters decide to abandon ‘default’ society, and the beliefs on which it’s built, to go in search of an alternative being built by other ‘walkaways’. While initially ignored by the established state, as increasing numbers of people join the walkaway movement, conflict arises. When a...

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Carapace by Davyne DeSye

Carapace Davyne DeSye Illuminus, 338 pages Review by Steve Ironside Some books you regret picking up, some are just a joy to read, and some feel like a bit of a slog, but at the last page you can put it down and say, “that was worth it”. Carapace initially felt like it belonged in the first category, but as I continued to read, I came around to fitting it into the last. There’s a journey in this novel, and it’s worth sticking with it. The book opens at what feels immediately like the end of part one of...

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The Delirium Brief by Charles Stross

The Delirium Brief Charles Stross Orbit, 435 pages Review by Duncan Lunan The press release for this novel begins “James Bond meets H.P. Lovecraft in the latest occult thriller from Hugo Award winner Charles Stross, in a series where British spies take on the supernatural”. The Bond reference is apt because it’s sometimes alleged that the 00-numbers go back to Elizabethan times, possibly to Francis Walsingham’s agents, signifying either ‘the eyes of the Queen’ or ‘For Your Eyes Only’ in coded messages to her. And the real-life connections of Ian Fleming and his brother Peter to the wartime Special...

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Under the Pendulum Sun by Jeannette Ng

Under the Pendulum Sun Jeannette Ng Angry Robot, 416 pages Review by Marija Smits The central premise of Under the Pendulum Sun is a strong one: to what lengths will a missionary go to bring faith to the faithless? But here’s where the premise gets really interesting – the faithless are the inhabitants of Arcadia, the fae. Laon Helstone is the Victorian missionary in question, and yet the story is told from the viewpoint of his sister, Catherine. It is Catherine who goes in search of him when his letters from Arcadia suddenly stop arriving, and it is Catherine...

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Sirens by Simon Messingham

Sirens Simon Messingham Derelict Space Sheep, 338 pages Review by Katie Gray I was tentatively excited for Sirens. Being a die-hard Doctor Who fan I was familiar with Simon Messingham’s work – he’s the author of no less than seven expanded universe novels across four different books ranges. Naturally I was interested to read his first original novel and Sirens had an intriguing and gripping premise. All around the world, two hundred people simultaneously acquire the same superpower: the ability to ‘glamour’ other human beings, to make them fall utterly and wholeheartedly in love with you. Glamoured people will...

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